Author Topic: a second TED5000, for monitoring one breaker at a time  (Read 12255 times)

pfletch101

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Re: a second TED5000, for monitoring one breaker at a time
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2011, 10:11:56 AM »
FYI attic fans usually cost you more in airconditioning not less.  The reason is that unless your house has all the wire penatrations and joints sealed in the attic you may end up creating negative pressure in the attic and actually sucking conditioned air out of the house making your AC run even more.

Would you like to present some evidence for this sweeping statement? I think that it would be more reasonable to say that the amount of net cost savings achieved (or not) by installing an attic fan in an otherwise reasonably well ventilated and insulated attic remains controversial.

It should be self-evident that the first step in reducing heating and cooling costs is to pay attention to the 'envelope' of your home. If your attic is so poorly ventilated and the interface between it and the conditioned space of your house so leaky that an attic fan would entrain enough conditioned air to add significantly to your air-conditioning costs, then of course you shouldn't install one. What you should do is fix the serious problems that you have identified and are costing you far more than even an enthusiast would claim an attic fan will save you!

An unfinished attic is unconditioned space. For all sorts of reasons, it should be adequately ventilated, with vents of appropriate size low down (usually at the eaves) and near the peak, so that passive ventilation is assisted by convection. There may be something additional to be gained by adding active attic ventilation (= an attic fan), but good passive ventilation is an essential starting point.

Another first principle of home energy management is to identify and seal (as far as possible), all the routes by which unconditioned air can enter and conditioned air can leave your home. These include penetrations into unconditioned (attic, basement) space and through outside walls. Until you have done as much as you can to address potential routes for unwanted heat gain and loss, you should probably not start to think about active approaches such as attic fans or solar panels.

« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 12:11:06 PM by pfletch101 »
Peter R. Fletcher
TED Pro Home - main MTUs monitoring utility and PV Solar feeds; 2 Spyders monitoring selected individual circuits

martingugino

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Re: a second TED5000, for monitoring one breaker at a time
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2011, 11:36:31 AM »
Quote
FYI attic fans usually cost you more in airconditioning not less.
We hardly ever ran the a/c.  Too expensive. ;-)
But your thought was that it would work but be too inefficient. However, it didn't work, as I said, for some unknown reason.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 11:40:17 AM by martingugino »